Museum Folkwang
Birkenwald
  • Christian Rohlfs
  • Birkenwald, 1907

  • Birch Forest
  • Oil on canvas
  • Bildmaß 110 x 75 cm
    Bildmaß 109,5 x 74 cm Lichtes Maß
  • Acquired in 1912 by Karl Ernst Osthaus for the Museum Folkwang, Hagen, confiscated in 1937, re-acquired in 1958 with support of teh City of Essen
  • Inv. G 291
  • CommentaryAt Henry van de Velde’s recommendation and Karl Ernst Osthaus’s request, Chritian Rohlfs moved from Weimar to Hagen, taking a studio in the just-opened museum. In direct contact with a rapidly expanding museum Folkwang-collection, which already included works by van Gogh, Gauguin and the Pointillists Seurat, Signac, Rhysselberghe and Luce, Rohlfs’ painting style took a new direction. After Impressionist and Neo-Impressionist phases, he quickly took up with the young “Wilde”, as the generation of young painters of the artist group ‘Die Brücke’ were called. “His painting is a music of colors” – with these words Osthaus described Rohlfs’ paintings and this also applies to ‘Beech Forest’. Intensive yellow, blue and red tones in an expressive interplay with the luminous white of the beech trunks create an autumnal explosion of color. Osthaus probably acquired ‘Beech Forest’ the year it was made. In 1922 the painting was moved to Essen with the rest of the Osthaus collection. In 1937 ‘Beech Forest’, together with other works by the artist, was declared ‘decadent’ and confiscated.
  • ProvenanceKünstler
    1912 spätestens - 1917, Museum Folkwang, Hagen
    08.03.1917, Auktion Paul Cassirer, Berlin
    1917 - 1918, Graefe
    1918 - 1922, Rückkauf von Graefe, Museum Folkwang, Hagen
    1922 - 25.08.1937, Museum Folkwang, Essen
    25.08.1937, für die Ausstellung "Entartete Kunst" in München, Beschlagnahmung durch das Reichsministerium für Volksaufklärung und Propaganda, Berlin
    08.1939 - 13.02.1939, Depot Schloss Schönhausen
    13.02.1939, Kauf vom Deutschen Reich, Bernhard A. Böhmer, Güstrow
    05.1945, Nachlass Böhmer, Wilma Zelck, Rostock (Schwägerin von B. A. Böhmer)
    1958, Dr. Edgar Horstmann, Hamburg
    1958, Kauf bei Horstmann, Museum Folkwang, Essen
  • Obj_Id: 3,480
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 187
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Museum Folkwang, Essen, Gemäldesammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: Birkenwald
  • Obj_Title2_S: Birch Forest
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Birkenwald Birch Forest Birkenwald
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1907
  • Jahr von: 1,907
  • Jahr bis: 1,907
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: G 291
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: G 0291
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Painting
  • Obj_Crate_S: Bildmaß 110 x 75 cm
    Bildmaß 109,5 x 74 cm Lichtes Maß
  • Obj_Material_S: Oil on canvas
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Oil on canvas
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Acquired in 1912 by Karl Ernst Osthaus for the Museum Folkwang, Hagen, confiscated in 1937, re-acquired in 1958 with support of teh City of Essen
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

At Henry van de Velde’s recommendation and Karl Ernst Osthaus’s request, Chritian Rohlfs moved from Weimar to Hagen, taking a studio in the just-opened museum. In direct contact with a rapidly expanding museum Folkwang-collection, which already included works by van Gogh, Gauguin and the Pointillists Seurat, Signac, Rhysselberghe and Luce, Rohlfs’ painting style took a new direction. After Impressionist and Neo-Impressionist phases, he quickly took up with the young “Wilde”, as the generation of young painters of the artist group ‘Die Brücke’ were called. “His painting is a music of colors” – with these words Osthaus described Rohlfs’ paintings and this also applies to ‘Beech Forest’. Intensive yellow, blue and red tones in an expressive interplay with the luminous white of the beech trunks create an autumnal explosion of color. Osthaus probably acquired ‘Beech Forest’ the year it was made. In 1922 the painting was moved to Essen with the rest of the Osthaus collection. In 1937 ‘Beech Forest’, together with other works by the artist, was declared ‘decadent’ and confiscated.