Museum Folkwang
Eines Garten
  • Ernst Wilhelm Nay
  • Eines Garten, 1952

  • Of a Garden
  • Oil on canvas
  • 100,5 x 124,5 cm
  • Acquired 1952 with the support of the City of Essen
  • Inv. G 228
  • CommentaryNext to Willi Baumeister and Fritz Winter, Ernst Wilhelm Nay is one of the most significant representatives of abstract painting in postwar Germany. Although the title ›Eines Garten‹ (Of a Garden) alludes to the concrete world, the genitive case already leads the beholder into a realm of intangibility: It remains unclear as to what the artist is referencing. What we see is a rhythmically expressive fabric of colors, forms, and lines. While they do make room for associations with a garden, the elements nonetheless elude classification as actual plants and growths, giving rise to an autonomous pictorial structure bound to the planar surface.
  • ProvenanceKünstler
    1952, Galerie Ferdinand Möller, Köln
    1952, Kauf bei Möller, Museum Folkwang, Essen
  • Obj_Id: 3,422
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 187
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Gemäldesammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: Eines Garten
  • Obj_Title2_S: Of a Garden
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Eines Garten Of a Garden Eines Garten
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1952
  • Jahr von: 1,952
  • Jahr bis: 1,952
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: G 228
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: G 0228
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Painting
  • Obj_Crate_S: 100,5 x 124,5 cm
  • Obj_Material_S: Oil on canvas
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Oil on canvas
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Acquired 1952 with the support of the City of Essen
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Elisabeth Nay-Scheibler, Köln / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

Next to Willi Baumeister and Fritz Winter, Ernst Wilhelm Nay is one of the most significant representatives of abstract painting in postwar Germany. Although the title ›Eines Garten‹ (Of a Garden) alludes to the concrete world, the genitive case already leads the beholder into a realm of intangibility: It remains unclear as to what the artist is referencing. What we see is a rhythmically expressive fabric of colors, forms, and lines. While they do make room for associations with a garden, the elements nonetheless elude classification as actual plants and growths, giving rise to an autonomous pictorial structure bound to the planar surface.