Museum Folkwang
Photograph by Peter A. Juley & Sons, New York made to commemorate the wedding of Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur, to Sanyogita Raje, 1924, found and re-photographed in Turin
  • Simon Starling
  • Photograph by Peter A. Juley & Sons, New York made to commemorate the wedding of Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur, to Sanyogita Raje, 1924, found and re-photographed in Turin, 2008

  • part of ›Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations‹
  • Marble and platinum/palladium print
  • Acquired in 2008 with support of the Ernst und Elly Henke-Stiftung, Essen
  • Inv. P 306/4
  • CommentaryPrince Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur (1908-1961) was the great grandson of Tukoji Rao Holkar II* who was chosen by the British Governor General as the ruler of Indore in 1844. As a young boy Prince Yeshwant was sent to school in Cheam, England and then went on to study at Charter House College and Christ Church College, Oxford. During his time in England he travelled widely throughout Europe and became interested in modernity and architecture. He made numerous visits to fairs and exhibitions in Berlin, London and Paris and discovered the Deutscher Werkbund and the Bauhaus in Germany and the U.A.M (Union des Artistes Modernes) in Paris. In 1930 he also met Constantin Brancusi in his studio following an introduction by the author, diplomat and art dealer, Henri-Pierre Roché.*

    *Tukoji Rao Holkar II was responsible for the substantial modernisation of the state by creating new infrastructures including communications, transport and banking, and as a result made Indore an important economic centre. His son continued this process of modernisation and invited the Scottish town planner, sociologist and garden city advocate Patrick Geddes (1854–1932) to Indore. Geddes carried out important work in town planning and urban hygiene between 1915 and 1918. Geddes is best known in Scotland as the owner of Edinburgh’s Outlook Tower, a camera obscura with a view of the Edinburgh skyline. This popular attraction was just one part of a complex museum that attempted to understand late 19th century Edinburgh within a global context.

    In May, 1957 Roché wrote: “One day I introduced a young Indian prince that I had known in Oxford to Brancusi. They liked each other. The visitor looked at all the works as slowly and carefully as if in a fairytale. He did not have much money at that time."
  • Provenance2008, Galleria Franco Noero, Turin
  • Obj_Id: 31,226
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 188
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Musuem Folkwang, Essen, Skulpturensammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: Photograph by Peter A. Juley & Sons, New York made to commemorate the wedding of Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur, to Sanyogita Raje, 1924, found and re-photographed in Turin
  • Obj_Title2_S:
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg): part of ›Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations‹
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Photograph by Peter A. Juley & Sons, New York made to commemorate the wedding of Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur, to Sanyogita Raje, 1924, found and re-photographed in Turin part of ›Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations‹ Photograph by Peter A. Juley & Sons, New York made to commemorate the wedding of Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur, to Sanyogita Raje, 1924, found and re-photographed in Turin Fotografie von Peter A. Juley & Sons, New York zur Erinnerung an die Hochzeit des Maharadscha
    Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur mit Sanyogita Raje, 1924, in Turin gefunden und reproduziert. aus der Installation: Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations
  • Obj_Dating_S: 2008
  • Jahr von: 2,008
  • Jahr bis: 2,008
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: P 306/4
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: P 306/4
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Photography
  • Obj_Crate_S:
  • Obj_Material_S: Marble and platinum/palladium print
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Marble and platinum/palladium print
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Acquired in 2008 with support of the Ernst und Elly Henke-Stiftung, Essen
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Simon Starling, 2010
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

Prince Yeshwant Rao Holkar Bahadur (1908-1961) was the great grandson of Tukoji Rao Holkar II* who was chosen by the British Governor General as the ruler of Indore in 1844. As a young boy Prince Yeshwant was sent to school in Cheam, England and then went on to study at Charter House College and Christ Church College, Oxford. During his time in England he travelled widely throughout Europe and became interested in modernity and architecture. He made numerous visits to fairs and exhibitions in Berlin, London and Paris and discovered the Deutscher Werkbund and the Bauhaus in Germany and the U.A.M (Union des Artistes Modernes) in Paris. In 1930 he also met Constantin Brancusi in his studio following an introduction by the author, diplomat and art dealer, Henri-Pierre Roché.*

*Tukoji Rao Holkar II was responsible for the substantial modernisation of the state by creating new infrastructures including communications, transport and banking, and as a result made Indore an important economic centre. His son continued this process of modernisation and invited the Scottish town planner, sociologist and garden city advocate Patrick Geddes (1854–1932) to Indore. Geddes carried out important work in town planning and urban hygiene between 1915 and 1918. Geddes is best known in Scotland as the owner of Edinburgh’s Outlook Tower, a camera obscura with a view of the Edinburgh skyline. This popular attraction was just one part of a complex museum that attempted to understand late 19th century Edinburgh within a global context.

In May, 1957 Roché wrote: “One day I introduced a young Indian prince that I had known in Oxford to Brancusi. They liked each other. The visitor looked at all the works as slowly and carefully as if in a fairytale. He did not have much money at that time."