Museum Folkwang
Copies of ›The Tiger of Eschnapur‹ and ›The Indian Tomb‹, by Joe May, Richard Eichberg and Fritz Lang, photographed at the Film Museum, Frankfurt am Main
  • Simon Starling
  • Copies of ›The Tiger of Eschnapur‹ and ›The Indian Tomb‹, by Joe May, Richard Eichberg and Fritz Lang, photographed at the Film Museum, Frankfurt am Main, 2008

  • part of ›Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations‹
  • Marble and platinum/palladium print
  • Acquired in 2008 with support of the Ernst und Elly Henke-Stiftung, Essen
  • Inv. P 306/13
  • CommentaryAt the beginning of Joe May’s ›The Indian Tomb‹, written by Fritz Lang and Thea von Harbou and filmed in Berlin in 1921, a Yogi master named Ramigani dematerializes at the court of the powerful Maharaja of Eschnapur and rematerializes in the home of a European architect, Herbert Rowland, played by the Danish matinee idol Olaf Fønss. The Yogi master persuades the architect to travel to India to build a massive Tomb in which the Maharaja intends to imprison his wife Princess Savitri whose love he has lost to a dashing British officer, MacAllan. Two subsequent versions of this epic adventure were made, the first under National Socialism in 1938, was directed by Richard Eichberg and the second in 1958 by the film’s original co-author, Fritz Lang. Lang’s Indian epic was shot on location in Udaipur, India, with the help and cooperation of the Maharaja of Udaipur. It’s central character, a handsome German, functionalist architect*, arrives in India to modernise Eschnapur, building hospitals and schools and in so doing introducing Western science and technology to the city. In Lang’s films it is the architect himself who wins the heart of the dancer, Seetha, played by Debra Paget, who is already promised in marriage to the Maharaja.

    *The real-life architect Eckart Muthesius was involved as a consultant on Fritz Lang’s films.
  • Provenance2008, Galleria Franco Noero, Turin
  • Obj_Id: 31,211
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 188
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Musuem Folkwang, Essen, Skulpturensammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: Copies of ›The Tiger of Eschnapur‹ and ›The Indian Tomb‹, by Joe May, Richard Eichberg and Fritz Lang, photographed at the Film Museum, Frankfurt am Main
  • Obj_Title2_S:
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg): part of ›Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations‹
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Copies of ›The Tiger of Eschnapur‹ and ›The Indian Tomb‹, by Joe May, Richard Eichberg and Fritz Lang, photographed at the Film Museum, Frankfurt am Main part of ›Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations‹ Copies of ›The Tiger of Eschnapur‹ and ›The Indian Tomb‹, by Joe May, Richard Eichberg and Fritz Lang, photographed at the Film Museum, Frankfurt am Main Kopien von ›Der Tiger von Eschnapur‹ und ›Das indische Grabmal‹, von Joe May, Richard Eichberg und Fritz Lang, aufgenommen im Film Museum, Frankfurt am Main aus der Installation: Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolations and Bifurcations
  • Obj_Dating_S: 2008
  • Jahr von: 2,008
  • Jahr bis: 2,008
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: P 306/13
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: P 306/13
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Photography
  • Obj_Crate_S:
  • Obj_Material_S: Marble and platinum/palladium print
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Marble and platinum/palladium print
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Acquired in 2008 with support of the Ernst und Elly Henke-Stiftung, Essen
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Simon Starling, 2010
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

2008, Galleria Franco Noero, Turin