Museum Folkwang
Das Frauenhaus von Brescia
  • Josef Fenneker
  • Das Frauenhaus von Brescia, 1920

  • Brescia Brothel
  • 139,8 x 92,5 cm
  • Printing Press Dinse & Eckert, Berlin
  • Inv. DPM 8085
  • CommentaryAfter the First World War, Expressionism also reached poster design. At first it was political posters that reflected the ›strife-torn times‹; they were followed by posters for art and culture. An important exponent of Expressionist film posters was Josef Fenneker.
    The story of the silent film ›Das Frauenhaus von Brescia‹ (Hubert Moest, 1920) is set in medieval Germany and is about a woman’s dramatic destiny: Heinrich der Lützelburger is crowned king of Langobardia. His wife Margarete follows after him, is taken prisoner in Brescia and put in a brothel. After a first showing in Hamburg in August 1920 (Lessing Theater) and the premier in Berlin (Marmorhaus) a month later, the film was banned by the film censorship board A 55 in a resolution of 27 July, 1921. After appeal, the film could be shown again from 21 September, 1921. The film company tried to get around a new ban by changing considerably a number of scenes. However, on 5 August, 1923, the film was banned for good.
  • Obj_Id: 30,430
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):German Poster Museum
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 242
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Deutsches Plakat Museum im Museum Folkwang
  • Obj_Title1_S: Das Frauenhaus von Brescia
  • Obj_Title2_S: Brescia Brothel
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Das Frauenhaus von Brescia Brescia Brothel Das Frauenhaus von Brescia
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1920
  • Jahr von: 1,920
  • Jahr bis: 1,920
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: DPM 8085
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: DPM 008085
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Poster
  • Obj_Crate_S: 139,8 x 92,5 cm
  • Obj_Material_S:
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.):
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb):
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei): Dinse & Eckert, Berlin
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
    Photo: Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists

After the First World War, Expressionism also reached poster design. At first it was political posters that reflected the ›strife-torn times‹; they were followed by posters for art and culture. An important exponent of Expressionist film posters was Josef Fenneker.
The story of the silent film ›Das Frauenhaus von Brescia‹ (Hubert Moest, 1920) is set in medieval Germany and is about a woman’s dramatic destiny: Heinrich der Lützelburger is crowned king of Langobardia. His wife Margarete follows after him, is taken prisoner in Brescia and put in a brothel. After a first showing in Hamburg in August 1920 (Lessing Theater) and the premier in Berlin (Marmorhaus) a month later, the film was banned by the film censorship board A 55 in a resolution of 27 July, 1921. After appeal, the film could be shown again from 21 September, 1921. The film company tried to get around a new ban by changing considerably a number of scenes. However, on 5 August, 1923, the film was banned for good.