Museum Folkwang
Simplicissimus
  • Thomas Theodor (eigentlich: David Theodor) Heine
  • Simplicissimus, 1896

  • Journal
  • [Mastiff]
  • 74 x 52,5 cm
  • Printing Press k.A.
  • Inv. DPM 7043
  • CommentaryThe satirical journal ›Simplicissimus‹ was founded by Albert Langen (1869-1909) and Thomas Theodor Heine in 1896. The aim of the »Simpl«, as it was soon known, was to criticize the government under the guise of satire and was thus exactly the opposite of ›Jugend‹, another journal of the same period. Individual issues were often banned, and in Austria even the magazine itself. Well-known contributors included Hermann Hesse (1877-1962) and Thomas Mann (1875-1955). With the red bulldog, Heine created one of the most radical designs of his time. Its focussed message and the associative power of its design made it one of the most abrasive posters of its day.
  • Obj_Id: 30,420
  • Obj_Internet_S: Highlight
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):German Poster Museum
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 242
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Deutsches Plakat Museum im Museum Folkwang
  • Obj_Title1_S: Simplicissimus
  • Obj_Title2_S: Journal
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg): [Mastiff]
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Simplicissimus Journal [Mastiff] Simplicissimus [Dogge]
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1896
  • Jahr von: 1,896
  • Jahr bis: 1,896
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: DPM 7043
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: DPM 007043
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Poster
  • Obj_Crate_S: 74 x 52,5 cm
  • Obj_Material_S:
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.):
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb):
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei): k.A.
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Dr. Herbert Fleissner/F.A. Herbig Verlagsbuchhandlung GmbH, München
    Photo: Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists

The satirical journal ›Simplicissimus‹ was founded by Albert Langen (1869-1909) and Thomas Theodor Heine in 1896. The aim of the »Simpl«, as it was soon known, was to criticize the government under the guise of satire and was thus exactly the opposite of ›Jugend‹, another journal of the same period. Individual issues were often banned, and in Austria even the magazine itself. Well-known contributors included Hermann Hesse (1877-1962) and Thomas Mann (1875-1955). With the red bulldog, Heine created one of the most radical designs of his time. Its focussed message and the associative power of its design made it one of the most abrasive posters of its day.