Museum Folkwang
La fête de Bacchus (Le soir)
  • Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot
  • La fête de Bacchus (Le soir), 1866

  • The Feast of Bacchus
  • Oil on canvas
  • 134,5 x 110,5 cm
  • Acquired in 1979 with the support of the State of North Rhine-Westfalia and the Eugen-und-Agnes-von-Waldthausen-Platzhoff-Museums-Stiftung
  • Inv. G 432
  • CommentaryCorot only decided to become a painter at the age of 26. To do so he felt that a trip to Italy was absolutely necessary and so he left for Rome in 1825, where he stayed for three years. His early Italian landscapes and figures, which earned him his first successes in the Paris salons around 1830, are remarkable for their clarity in composition, form and color. In 1834 and in 1843 he traveled to Italy again; other trips took him to England, Holland and Switzerland. In France he preferred to live in the provinces to paint landscapes there. Corot had close ties with the Barbizon, a group of artists, especially with Jean-François Millet and Charles-François Daubigny.
    The ›Feast of Bacchus‹ is an atmospheric, seemingly poetic work by the 70 year-old artist and shows a sensitive manner of painting which blurred colors often seen his later works. A dancing women to the left and the figures to the right in the background gathered around the drunken God of wine, Bacchus can only be discerned in outline in the evening light of the landscape depicted. On the left side, the darkness of the image opens out onto a deeply lying horizon. The pink of the dusk and blue of the sky contrast with the scenes painted in dark tones in the foreground. The theme mentioned in the title thus becomes a trivial detail of this Arcadian landscape in the tradition of Claude Lorrain.
  • ProvenanceSammlung M. Fanien, USA
    Charles Dana und (?) George Gould, USA
    1979, Galerie Dr. Fritz und Dr. Peter Nathan, Zürich
    seit 1979, Museum Folkwang, Essen
  • Obj_Id: 3,041
  • Obj_Internet_S: Highlight
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 187
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Gemäldesammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: La fête de Bacchus (Le soir)
  • Obj_Title2_S: The Feast of Bacchus
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): La fête de Bacchus (Le soir) The Feast of Bacchus La fête de Bacchus (Le soir) Das Fest des Bacchus
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1866
  • Jahr von: 1,866
  • Jahr bis: 1,866
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: G 432
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: G 0432
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Painting
  • Obj_Crate_S: 134,5 x 110,5 cm
  • Obj_Material_S: Oil on canvas
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Oil on canvas
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Acquired in 1979 with the support of the State of North Rhine-Westfalia and the Eugen-und-Agnes-von-Waldthausen-Platzhoff-Museums-Stiftung
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

Corot only decided to become a painter at the age of 26. To do so he felt that a trip to Italy was absolutely necessary and so he left for Rome in 1825, where he stayed for three years. His early Italian landscapes and figures, which earned him his first successes in the Paris salons around 1830, are remarkable for their clarity in composition, form and color. In 1834 and in 1843 he traveled to Italy again; other trips took him to England, Holland and Switzerland. In France he preferred to live in the provinces to paint landscapes there. Corot had close ties with the Barbizon, a group of artists, especially with Jean-François Millet and Charles-François Daubigny.
The ›Feast of Bacchus‹ is an atmospheric, seemingly poetic work by the 70 year-old artist and shows a sensitive manner of painting which blurred colors often seen his later works. A dancing women to the left and the figures to the right in the background gathered around the drunken God of wine, Bacchus can only be discerned in outline in the evening light of the landscape depicted. On the left side, the darkness of the image opens out onto a deeply lying horizon. The pink of the dusk and blue of the sky contrast with the scenes painted in dark tones in the foreground. The theme mentioned in the title thus becomes a trivial detail of this Arcadian landscape in the tradition of Claude Lorrain.