Museum Folkwang
pst! / Feind hört mit
  • Richard Blank
  • pst! / Feind hört mit, 1943-1944

  • pst! A Careless Talk
  • Offset print
  • 58,2 x 42 cm
  • Printing Press WW-Verlag, Berlin
  • Inv. DPM 4567
  • CommentaryThe campaign ›pst! The enemy’s listening‹ was started in 1943 with considerable expenditure. At this time it was already becoming clear that the war could not be won: The campaign is part of a shift from victory to endurance propaganda. In shaping a shadowy man and putting the characteristic ›pst!‹ letters in yellow, Richard Blank contributed significantly to the campaign’s undisputed success. Both elements conflict formally with the realistic drawing. Put together, they form a seemingly latent threat, suggesting danger and using this vague suggestion to real propaganda effect. The campaign succeeded within a few months in gaining acceptance among the population in general as a code for uncertain and thus hidden danger. Its success seems to confirm the mass psychology notion: »The art of exiting the mass’s imagination is the art of ruling« (Gustave le Bon, 1881-1931).
  • Obj_Id: 30,405
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):German Poster Museum
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 242
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Deutsches Plakat Museum im Museum Folkwang
  • Obj_Title1_S: pst! / Feind hört mit
  • Obj_Title2_S: pst! A Careless Talk
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): pst! / Feind hört mit pst! A Careless Talk pst! / Feind hört mit
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1943-1944
  • Jahr von: 1,943
  • Jahr bis: 1,944
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: DPM 4567
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: DPM 004567
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Poster
  • Obj_Crate_S: 58,2 x 42 cm
  • Obj_Material_S:
  • Obj_Technique_S: Offset print
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Offset print
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb):
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei): WW-Verlag, Berlin
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
    Photo: Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists

The campaign ›pst! The enemy’s listening‹ was started in 1943 with considerable expenditure. At this time it was already becoming clear that the war could not be won: The campaign is part of a shift from victory to endurance propaganda. In shaping a shadowy man and putting the characteristic ›pst!‹ letters in yellow, Richard Blank contributed significantly to the campaign’s undisputed success. Both elements conflict formally with the realistic drawing. Put together, they form a seemingly latent threat, suggesting danger and using this vague suggestion to real propaganda effect. The campaign succeeded within a few months in gaining acceptance among the population in general as a code for uncertain and thus hidden danger. Its success seems to confirm the mass psychology notion: »The art of exiting the mass’s imagination is the art of ruling« (Gustave le Bon, 1881-1931).