Museum Folkwang
Olympia / anciennes / Montagnes Russes / Boulevard des Capucines
  • Jules Chéret
  • Olympia / anciennes / Montagnes Russes / Boulevard des Capucines, 1892

  • Olympia / Old / Roller Coaster / Boulevard des Capucines
  • Colour lithography
  • 123 x 88 cm
  • Printing Press Imp. Chaix, Paris
  • Inv. DPM 10843
  • CommentaryJules Chéret is seen as the father of modern posters. Beginning in the second half of the 19th century, this trained lithographer perfected this print technique step by step. He not only succeeded in enlarging the print format but was also the first prominent designer of this new technique. It was his posters that gave viewers their fist visual impression of the nascent ›new age‹. Their effectiveness was not only enormous among the general public. Artists such as Henri de Toulouse-Latrec and Theophile-Alexandre Steinlen also took to the new medium and transformed poster’s special visual language into a new art genre. The fame of his successors superseded Chéret’s pioneering work.

    Chéret generally used well-built, easy-going women in his products for his clients. His female figures – soon called »Chéretten« – attracted a lot of attention and perhaps it was they who spread the reputation of Parisian women as allegedly easy-going beauties.
  • Obj_Id: 30,283
  • Obj_Internet_S: Highlight
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):German Poster Museum
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 242
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Deutsches Plakat Museum im Museum Folkwang
  • Obj_Title1_S: Olympia / anciennes / Montagnes Russes / Boulevard des Capucines
  • Obj_Title2_S: Olympia / Old / Roller Coaster / Boulevard des Capucines
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Olympia / anciennes / Montagnes Russes / Boulevard des Capucines Olympia / Old / Roller Coaster / Boulevard des Capucines Olympia / anciennes / Montagnes Russes / Boulevard des Capucines Olympia / Alte / Achterbahn / Boulevard des Capucines
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1892
  • Jahr von: 1,892
  • Jahr bis: 1,892
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: DPM 10843
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: DPM 010843
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Poster
  • Obj_Crate_S: 123 x 88 cm
  • Obj_Material_S:
  • Obj_Technique_S: Colour lithography
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Colour lithography
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb):
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei): Imp. Chaix, Paris
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
    Photo: Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists

Jules Chéret is seen as the father of modern posters. Beginning in the second half of the 19th century, this trained lithographer perfected this print technique step by step. He not only succeeded in enlarging the print format but was also the first prominent designer of this new technique. It was his posters that gave viewers their fist visual impression of the nascent ›new age‹. Their effectiveness was not only enormous among the general public. Artists such as Henri de Toulouse-Latrec and Theophile-Alexandre Steinlen also took to the new medium and transformed poster’s special visual language into a new art genre. The fame of his successors superseded Chéret’s pioneering work.

Chéret generally used well-built, easy-going women in his products for his clients. His female figures – soon called »Chéretten« – attracted a lot of attention and perhaps it was they who spread the reputation of Parisian women as allegedly easy-going beauties.