Museum Folkwang
Louveciennes, Chemin de Creux, Louveciennes, neige
  • Camille Pissarro
  • Louveciennes, Chemin de Creux, Louveciennes, neige, 1872

  • Snow Landscape in Louveciennes
  • Oil on canvas
  • 46 x 55 cm
  • Aquired in 1965 with support of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, the Westdeutsche Rundfunk Köln and the Folkwang-Museumsverein
  • Inv. G 350
  • CommentaryLike many Impressionists, Camille Pissarro also fled the Franco-Prussian War of 1870/71 to England. There he studied intensively the works of William Turner and John Constable, whose painting would be decisive for his further artistic development. Back in France, Pissarro first went to Louveciennes, where he had settled in 1869. Shortly thereafter (1872) Pissarro moved to Pontoise, where he had already painted before the 1870 war, staying there until 1882. Most of the motifs from this very creative period come from the surroundings of Louveciennes and Pontoise, including this winter view of the park in Louveciennes. A mild, winterly sunlight falls from the right on the leafless trees, whose grey shadow can be seen on the melting snow. With broad, united brushstrokes he captures the entanglement of branches and boughs, the structure of the bark, the slim young trunks, the two houses to the left as fleeting instance, as a winterly impression. The ›sous bois‹ tradition of the Barbizon school whose aim was to capture nature faithfully, is still tangible in this painting.
  • ProvenancePrivatsammlung Washington
    Wildenstein, New York
    Barbara Hutton (USA)
    (1959), Fine Arts Associates, New York
    Galerie Grosshennig, Düsseldorf
    (1960), The Lefevre Gallery, London
    (1964), Paul Rosenberg, New York
    (1965), Dr. Walter Feilchenfeldt-Erben, Zürich
    1966, Marianne Feilchenfeldt, Zürich, erworben (Land Nord-Rhein-Westfalen, Westdeutscher Rundfunk)
    seit 1966
  • Obj_Id: 3,172
  • Obj_Internet_S: ja
  • Obj_Ownership_S (Verantw):Painting, Sculpture, Media Art
  • Obj_SpareNField01_N (Verantw): 187
  • Obj_Creditline_S: Gemäldesammlung
  • Obj_Title1_S: Louveciennes, Chemin de Creux, Louveciennes, neige
  • Obj_Title2_S: Snow Landscape in Louveciennes
  • Obj_PartDescription_S (Titelerg):
  • Obj_SpareMField01_M (Alle Titel): Louveciennes, Chemin de Creux, Louveciennes, neige Snow Landscape in Louveciennes Louveciennes, Chemin de Creux, Louveciennes, neige Schneelandschaft in Louveciennes
  • Obj_Dating_S: 1872
  • Jahr von: 1,872
  • Jahr bis: 1,872
  • Obj_IdentNr_S: G 350
  • Obj_IdentNrSort_S: G 0350
  • Obj_Classification_S (Objtyp): Painting
  • Obj_Crate_S: 46 x 55 cm
  • Obj_Material_S: Oil on canvas
  • Obj_Technique_S:
  • Obj_SpareSField01_S (Mat./Tech.): Oil on canvas
  • Obj_AccNote_S (Erwerb): Aquired in 1965 with support of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, the Westdeutsche Rundfunk Köln and the Folkwang-Museumsverein
  • Obj_PermanentLocation_S (Standort):
  • Obj_Condition1_S (Druckerei):
  • Obj_Condition2_S (Auflage):
  • Obj_Subtype_S (Genre):
  • Obj_Rights_S: © Museum Folkwang, Essen
Commentary
Artists
Provenance

Like many Impressionists, Camille Pissarro also fled the Franco-Prussian War of 1870/71 to England. There he studied intensively the works of William Turner and John Constable, whose painting would be decisive for his further artistic development. Back in France, Pissarro first went to Louveciennes, where he had settled in 1869. Shortly thereafter (1872) Pissarro moved to Pontoise, where he had already painted before the 1870 war, staying there until 1882. Most of the motifs from this very creative period come from the surroundings of Louveciennes and Pontoise, including this winter view of the park in Louveciennes. A mild, winterly sunlight falls from the right on the leafless trees, whose grey shadow can be seen on the melting snow. With broad, united brushstrokes he captures the entanglement of branches and boughs, the structure of the bark, the slim young trunks, the two houses to the left as fleeting instance, as a winterly impression. The ›sous bois‹ tradition of the Barbizon school whose aim was to capture nature faithfully, is still tangible in this painting.